After a stroke and avm bleed

is having a problem with dropping or dragging your feet common and does it go away
after having an avm bleed and stroke

I don’t know that I would say it is common, but certainly is not unheard of. If the bleed/stroke happens in an area of motor control of the legs and feet, it’s likely to happen I suppose.

There’s been a lot posted about foot drop recently here. If you haven’t, you might go to the box at the upper right next to the sign out note and type in “foot drop”. Will get a lot of info.

As for permanentness, my guess is it is seldom a full recovery without surgery. Any PT is bound to help, but if damage is done in the brain, it’s hard to recover.

Hope this helps.
Ron

My daughter still drags one of her feet a bit. When I pointed it out to the neurosurgeon he kind of shrugged. I definately got the message - she was really close to dead, so what’s a little bit of a toe drag. That said, it has improved. Her bleed was in her ocipital lobe.

Hi Rebecca,

Your comment shows the perspective of us vs the Drs. We want to be 100% restored, they fixed the near fatal issue, so in their eyes, it was 100% success.

I would encourage you to pursue physical therapy for the toe drag, and if that ends, find a good personal trainer that can help compensate with other muscles to try to correct it. Chari waited 10 yrs to get to the personal trainer stage (she did have some physical therapy earlier). Had she pursued the private trainer earlier, I think she would be walking better now.

ron

Rebecca said:

My daughter still drags one of her feet a bit. When I pointed it out to the neurosurgeon he kind of shrugged. I definately got the message - she was really close to dead, so what’s a little bit of a toe drag. That said, it has improved. Her bleed was in her ocipital lobe.

My son started to take anti-seuzure medicines 18 days ago. He has been through a lot, a bleeding and two craniotomies. So, I think taking medicines or drag a feet a bit is very small. The important thing is, our kids are alive and can have a norma life.

Rebecca said:

My daughter still drags one of her feet a bit. When I pointed it out to the neurosurgeon he kind of shrugged. I definately got the message - she was really close to dead, so what’s a little bit of a toe drag. That said, it has improved. Her bleed was in her ocipital lobe.

There are devices that can help retrain the muscles–my husband found the electric stimulation device his PT suggested rather hard to use, but it might be something you want to look into.