AVM connection with other disorders?

Sorry if this seems silly. I am new to the whole AVM thing. This is a question I will ask the neurologist when I see him (soon), but wanted to ask others as well:

Is there any connection between AVM’s and other brain disorders? For example, I have a circadean rhythm disorder called delayed sleep phase syndrome. The AVM that was just found is in my frontal lobe, right side.

I do hear rushing sounds often when I lay down (like at bed); not sure if this is a contributing problem to the sleep factor. I’m curious if increased/decreased blood flow to parts of the brain could affect the normal sleep rhythm.

what is delayed sleep syndrome like ?

Kiera said:

pauline horsley said:
what is delayed sleep syndrome like ?


DSP is where sleep onset is chronically later than a normal person's. Most people feel tired and are able to go to sleep between 10pm and 12am. Sleep onset usually takes 20-40min (more than that is considered insomnia). With DSPS I can't fall asleep till more like 3am. Everynight. Regardless of how much sleep I've had (even staying up for 1-2 days straight). Once a person with DSPS falls asleep it's usually a good 8hr, solid sleep...they just do it later.

Here is a link on DSPS:
http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/circadian-rhythm-disorde...
I don't think this article mentions it, but i have met/read about people with brain disorders/head trauma that have developed DSPS.

And then I found this about strokes and sleep:
http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/brain_basics/understanding_sleep...

So it's made me wonder.

WOW …thank you Kiera.

kiera,
i am not fully sure of the answer to that question…but it wouldn’t surprise me if it related…i can tell you the noise you here is the blood pumping through the avm…i could always here a noise like a washing machine in my head whenever i layed down…since the avm has been removed i have never heard it again…please let us know the answer when you talk with the neuro

Well I don’t know the answer to that, so be sure to ask your doctor. All I can say is what I’ve experienced. I have the noises in my head all the time-- the ocean sounds, the drum beating and the ringing and they diagnosed me with tinnitus. Since surgery in 98 I have been suffering with insomnia, the longest I’ve stayed awake without any sleep is 4 days. I’ve recently complained to my doctor about it and she gave me doxephin which is suppose to help me sleep. She gave me 10mg at 1st and it didn’t do a thing, Wednesday she prescribed 50mg. I’m still up late at night, but when I do sleep now I feel better after I wake up. I sleep about 5-6hrs, which I know is not enough, but I’m working on it. Sorry I can’t help you out on this one, but be sure to let us know what the doctor tells you. Good luck!

i only know(i dont know how relative it is but) sleep is the best medicine for all the brain disorders deceases

Hey Kiera-

There are some genetic factors related to AVM’s, BUT most AVM’s really are just a “fluke” thing and are not related to other disorders. However I’m not a doctor and not completely sure that things may not be something that happens as a “side effect” of having an AVM.

Check out this forum posting as it discusses some of the syndromes that ARE genetically related to AVM’s.

I am going to throw caution to the wind and say, whenever there is something going awry in the brain, it can be linked to many, many things. Personally, I think my AVM is linked to my ADD and depression. This is because of where my AVM is in my brain. AVMs interrupt the normal system of capillaries delivering oxygen to your brain, so wherever your AVM is, that area of your brain is not getting the oxygen it is supposed to get, and thus is damaged. This damage may be slight and have no impact on your life at all, or could be more severe. I think to doctors, this is something of a mystery. AVMs are rare, and they are all unique. It is possible to blame it for lots of things (like I do), but in the end, there is a lot of guessing. It’s not easy to research… My best advice would be to trust your gut instincts, and do not give up on your hunches just because there is no current research to support it. On the other side of the coin, don’t obsess (easier said than done, I know), just because there is an AVM, does not mean that there are necessarily other problems. Stay strong–Marilyn

Hi Kiera, sorry I can’t help you on it. I had a craniotomy in 98 and when I went back for my check-up I told the doc I was hearing sounds in my ear that I had never heard before and he said, “oh sounds like you might be hearing the blood pumping through your your veins/arteries,” he said it as though it was no big deal…he eventually said that a lot of people have this problem, and that some haven’t had brain surgery. Please be sure to ask your doctor about it. Good Luck!