Loss of perephial vision

my wife had avm removed 11/17/2008, lost perephial vision in both eyes too the left
low vision specialist said will not be able too ever drive again, the avm was on right side towards back, surgeon says give a year, is their anyone have thiers too get back
thanks

Hi
I just wanted to let you know that the same thing happened to my mom. Her’s just happened so I don’t know if it’ll come back but she seems to be getting around pretty good. I am worried about her driving, crossing the street, etc. How is your wife doing with that loss? I hope it does come back!

we , just got the news today, they have gave her glasses with prisms, but they make her like a druc=nk women, they have prisms that bring everything too the left, her left eye is better as far as vision, she is actually doing great, the emotional part is what hurts her the most, all her different drs phy therapist , familydr etc tells her she is doing so good, her reply is if i am doing so great why cant i drive, but she is doing good, she is just the type that likes not too depend on someone, fortunatly i have job that i can come and go as needed, she sure can still see a garage sale sign with no problem, LOL
thanks
chip

Geans Burch said:

Hi
I just wanted to let you know that the same thing happened to my mom. Her’s just happened so I don’t know if it’ll come back but she seems to be getting around pretty good. I am worried about her driving, crossing the street, etc. How is your wife doing with that loss? I hope it does come back!

That’s funny about the garage sale. That sounds like my mom. I’m sure it is so frustrating for her. I know we always tell my mom she’s doing great and she’s probably thinking the same think, how can this be great when I can’t do what I want to do? From reading so many stories on this site it seems like time is the only think that really heals and I know that the waiting is the worst. Did she have a craniotomy? My mom’s having one on Wednesday and we’re pretty worried about it. She had a bleed a month ago and that’s why she lost the peripheral vision. I’m glad your wife is doing well other that the vision. I know the emotional side is really the hardest and being scared but trying to be strong for everyone else. Please take care and I’ll be thinking of you and your family.

actually i think it was a crainoyomy, hers avm was discovered by accident, she has thyroid probelms and had an ultosound of her thyroid which showed up that something wrong with blood flow, did a mri and that was when they found the avm, good luck and wish your mom the best, we had 3 weeks between find and surgery , really did not have time too think about it, had 3 options, glue, radition too shrink, or remove, ask dr what if it was his wife, remove was his answer, that is what we chose, their is some days she says she wish she wouldnt have had it done, but i remind her that she might not be here today, i always tell her you dont have too look too far see someone that has it a little or alot worse,

Geans Burch said:

That’s funny about the garage sale. That sounds like my mom. I’m sure it is so frustrating for her. I know we always tell my mom she’s doing great and she’s probably thinking the same think, how can this be great when I can’t do what I want to do? From reading so many stories on this site it seems like time is the only think that really heals and I know that the waiting is the worst. Did she have a craniotomy? My mom’s having one on Wednesday and we’re pretty worried about it. She had a bleed a month ago and that’s why she lost the peripheral vision. I’m glad your wife is doing well other that the vision. I know the emotional side is really the hardest and being scared but trying to be strong for everyone else. Please take care and I’ll be thinking of you and your family.

Hello, Carrol. I had a loss of my peripheral vision as well, only mine was on the opposite side (my right). I feel for your mom… It is not easy to go into surgery with nearly perfect vision, then come out and half of your vision is gone. What was worse, is that I was seeing everything double and could barely focus on anything. This eventually passed, but the peripheral loss was still gone. My neurosurgeon sent me to an opthamologist for peripheral vision tests every few weeks to track any changes. The whole time, the surgeon was saying that it could take several months, or even as much as a year for all of the swelling to go down after my craniotomy, so it was still possible that some or all of my vision could return. Unfortunately, after a year he basically said that it wasn’t going to come back, and after 4 years, it hasn’t.

That being said, I have learned to adapt, and while it has slowed me down a bit (especially reading!), I am working, supporting a family of three, still enjoying hobbies (various types of art, microelectronics, and other things that many people would think is impossible with only half of your vision), and yes… Even driving myself around.

I have also heard of some amazing stories where people have lost some or all of their vision, were blind for years, then woke one day only to find that their vision had returned. Certainly not the most common of situations, but stranger things have happened.

thanks for the response, actually it is my wife, she has , she did drove a couples time she was driving golf cart one day and reach down and ran into astreet sugn, this scared her, so she is afraid too drive
actually she was
disabled before her surgery from various medical conditions,after this last visit with low vsion specilist i told that u should never say never because who knows what will happen
thanks
again
carroll dye

Jake M said:

Hello, Carrol. I had a loss of my peripheral vision as well, only mine was on the opposite side (my right). I feel for your mom… It is not easy to go into surgery with nearly perfect vision, then come out and half of your vision is gone. What was worse, is that I was seeing everything double and could barely focus on anything. This eventually passed, but the peripheral loss was still gone. My neurosurgeon sent me to an opthamologist for peripheral vision tests every few weeks to track any changes. The whole time, the surgeon was saying that it could take several months, or even as much as a year for all of the swelling to go down after my craniotomy, so it was still possible that some or all of my vision could return. Unfortunately, after a year he basically said that it wasn’t going to come back, and after 4 years, it hasn’t.
That being said, I have learned to adapt, and while it has slowed me down a bit (especially reading!), I am working, supporting a family of three, still enjoying hobbies (various types of art, microelectronics, and other things that many people would think is impossible with only half of your vision), and yes… Even driving myself around.

I have also heard of some amazing stories where people have lost some or all of their vision, were blind for years, then woke one day only to find that their vision had returned. Certainly not the most common of situations, but stranger things have happened.

I had the same result from my surgery but you can learn to scan to the left consistantly and just be careful…it works. Good luck to your wife. my husband is forever saying "look to the left:)

thanks
carolyn
we are going too start that in her phy therapy class she takes for the surgery and different other health issues
thanks
carroll dye

Carolyn said:

I had the same result from my surgery but you can learn to scan to the left consistantly and just be careful…it works. Good luck to your wife. my husband is forever saying "look to the left:)

carolyn
do u still drive
carroll dye

Carolyn said:

I had the same result from my surgery but you can learn to scan to the left consistantly and just be careful…it works. Good luck to your wife. my husband is forever saying "look to the left:)

Hi there. I lost most of the vision in my left eye as a result of the bleed. It’s been about 14 months, and no improvement at all. For me it’s not just the vision loss that makes it impossible to drive, I tend to not see things correctly either. I have to look at something for a long time before I am sure of what I am seeing. I have issues with processing visual information correctly, have no depth perception and riding in a car scares me to death! My AVM was in the right parietal and occipital lobes, so probably similarto your wife’s. I don’t hold out much hope for any improvement, but who knows. I wish your wife the best!

thanks
trish
the best too u too
carroll dye

Trish said:

Hi there. I lost most of the vision in my left eye as a result of the bleed. It’s been about 14 months, and no improvement at all. For me it’s not just the vision loss that makes it impossible to drive, I tend to not see things correctly either. I have to look at something for a long time before I am sure of what I am seeing. I have issues with processing visual information correctly, have no depth perception and riding in a car scares me to death! My AVM was in the right parietal and occipital lobes, so probably similarto your wife’s. I don’t hold out much hope for any improvement, but who knows. I wish your wife the best!

My daughter lost the left half of her vision, but has slowly regained some. She was only 9 at the time of the bleed and I think that her age was the primary reason she was able to regain vision. There is a therapy called NovaVision that has some seriously mixed reviews for restoring vision loss from a stroke or AVM bleed. We chose not to use NovaVision for many reasons, but you can check it out if you like. Most states require at least 120 degrees of vision to drive (180 degrees is the normal visual range). My daughter barely makes the cut off. I still feel that driving with be dangerous. At least we have a few years before that I have to worry about that!

thanks for the response, her low vision specialist has told us about the vrt program, but he also said
that he did not think it would improve her vision enough too drive, but like i have said before she sure can still see a garage sale sign, she has drove twice since her surgery back on 11/17/2008,
thanks
carroll

Rebecca said:

My daughter lost the left half of her vision, but has slowly regained some. She was only 9 at the time of the bleed and I think that her age was the primary reason she was able to regain vision. There is a therapy called NovaVision that has some seriously mixed reviews for restoring vision loss from a stroke or AVM bleed. We chose not to use NovaVision for many reasons, but you can check it out if you like. Most states require at least 120 degrees of vision to drive (180 degrees is the normal visual range). My daughter barely makes the cut off. I still feel that driving with be dangerous. At least we have a few years before that I have to worry about that!

My AVM was in the same general part of the brain, and my peripheral vision was affected, first by narrowing my field of vision, and then a prolonged period of double-vision at the edges, which has been gradually going away. My neuro-ophthalmologist had told me the condition may be permanent, but as I have improved (my blind spots stopped being blind), he has been able to measure the improvement, and where I have not improved, I have stopped noticing the problem even exists. The short answer for me was it gets better, and where it doesn’t, the problem stops bothering me.

thanks rick
that will be encouraging for my wife

Rick Vernaci said:

My AVM was in the same general part of the brain, and my peripheral vision was affected, first by narrowing my field of vision, and then a prolonged period of double-vision at the edges, which has been gradually going away. My neuro-ophthalmologist had told me the condition may be permanent, but as I have improved (my blind spots stopped being blind), he has been able to measure the improvement, and where I have not improved, I have stopped noticing the problem even exists. The short answer for me was it gets better, and where it doesn’t, the problem stops bothering me.

rick
do u drive

Rick Vernaci said:

My AVM was in the same general part of the brain, and my peripheral vision was affected, first by narrowing my field of vision, and then a prolonged period of double-vision at the edges, which has been gradually going away. My neuro-ophthalmologist had told me the condition may be permanent, but as I have improved (my blind spots stopped being blind), he has been able to measure the improvement, and where I have not improved, I have stopped noticing the problem even exists. The short answer for me was it gets better, and where it doesn’t, the problem stops bothering me.

Dear Carroll,
I do drive (short distances, early in the day, when I’m at my best) but have only started doing so recently. Nobody ever took my license away, and my lawyer tells me as long as the license is in my pocket, I can use it. A couple of my doctors want me to take a driving test done by a nearby rehab place that is for people with brain injuries. I haven’t done it yet because it costs 500 bucks. But I wouldn’t get behind the wheel it I weren’t convinced I am fit to drive. I can walk up and down stairs, put on my socks while standing up, run three miles at a whack, and cut the grass. I drive with my 11-year-old son in the car. I don’t let him do anything where I think there is a remote possibility he could get hurt. I’ll eventually take the test but it’s more to make my doctors happy than anything else. Keeping them happy is important.
One thing this experience has taught me is that the brain is simultaneously a wonderful and fragile instrument. But despite being fragile, it is resilient. Take heart.
Cheers,
Rick

thanks
i will take it too heart, my wife she does alot, but you can walk up on her left side and she doesnt realize it, goin too start having her practice scanning by moving her head, as another member suggested
thanks

Rick Vernaci said:

Dear Carroll,
I do drive (short distances, early in the day, when I’m at my best) but have only started doing so recently. Nobody ever took my license away, and my lawyer tells me as long as the license is in my pocket, I can use it. A couple of my doctors want me to take a driving test done by a nearby rehab place that is for people with brain injuries. I haven’t done it yet because it costs 500 bucks. But I wouldn’t get behind the wheel it I weren’t convinced I am fit to drive. I can walk up and down stairs, put on my socks while standing up, run three miles at a whack, and cut the grass. I drive with my 11-year-old son in the car. I don’t let him do anything where I think there is a remote possibility he could get hurt. I’ll eventually take the test but it’s more to make my doctors happy than anything else. Keeping them happy is important.

One thing this experience has taught me is that the brain is simultaneously a wonderful and fragile instrument. But despite being fragile, it is resilient. Take heart.

Cheers,

Rick

my avm stole my left field vision as well…i have been told by many doctors that that part of my brain is dead and that my sight will never return …now 2 ye and a half years later i am begining to see movements and shodows in the left peerephial areas of my vision…i am sure it is the begining of my vision returning …dont lose hope stay positive and when the doctors tell you “never”…never believe them…i was told i would never walk again but i always believed i would…and i did…just like i have always believed i will one day drive again…so i know my vision will return even though they have said it wont…always believe if you truly believe in it it will happen…hang in there and give it a bit of time