Post craniotomy symptoms

I will be having surgery on the 12th of July for a DAVF on my occipitical lobe. I was wondering if there could be some suggestions on helping make my recovery quicker? I also am looking for a solution for nausea sans meds so that I can work out and walk before the surgery. Any thoughts? A-p-p-r-e-c-i-a-t-e-d :o).

Probably the most important tip for faster recovery: REEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT.

I've seen this often where you feel pretty good some days after surgery, so you think "OK, I think I'll take a long walk." You might finish the walk OK, but the next day your are hammered and down for several days. Plan a nap DAILY and get a full night's sleep. Eat well. Do meditation or whatever helps relax and focus you (yoga, reading, praying, listening to music, etc).

Let your friends/family (or hire) someone to clean your place, do the laundry, do the shopping, and take care of kids. They'll want to help and you need them to! Learn to be gracious in accepting help. Thank or pay them profusely.

Did the DR mention anything about potential temporary vision issues? Chari had an aneurysm surgery where he went in near the area of the optic nerve. He told her "I'm not going to be anywhere near touching the nerve, but sometimes just being in the area produces temporary vision issues". When she woke up in ICU, she looked at me focused fine. Then she blinked her eyes, and when she opened them again, one eye was focused on me and the other was like 45 degrees to the left. WOW! She had double vision. Either eye would work well, but with both open, she had two images, and they were stacked on top of each other. Made it tough for her to tell which was real, and telling where a counter top or the floor was was difficult.

DR said temporary, but he wouldn't quantify what that meant. The solution was to alternate an eye patch daily over each eye, so they would each stay strong. No changes for 30 some days, then one morning (and she was getting worried by this time), she woke up and they were focused again. Might not be an issue for you, but just a head's up.

Hope some of this info might help.

Best Wishes,

Ron, KS

Oh, forgot some of the most important: Head to Ivars on the pier, get some chowder and fish, sit outside and enjoy the beauty!

Least that's what I like to do when I'm in SEA.

ron, KS

XoXo. We love Ivar's too! Thank's Ron. I was wondering about the vision. Best regards ... Laura Bury



Ron, Kansas said:

Probably the most important tip for faster recovery: REEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT.

I've seen this often where you feel pretty good some days after surgery, so you think "OK, I think I'll take a long walk." You might finish the walk OK, but the next day your are hammered and down for several days. Plan a nap DAILY and get a full night's sleep. Eat well. Do meditation or whatever helps relax and focus you (yoga, reading, praying, listening to music, etc).

Let your friends/family (or hire) someone to clean your place, do the laundry, do the shopping, and take care of kids. They'll want to help and you need them to! Learn to be gracious in accepting help. Thank or pay them profusely.

Did the DR mention anything about potential temporary vision issues? Chari had an aneurysm surgery where he went in near the area of the optic nerve. He told her "I'm not going to be anywhere near touching the nerve, but sometimes just being in the area produces temporary vision issues". When she woke up in ICU, she looked at me focused fine. Then she blinked her eyes, and when she opened them again, one eye was focused on me and the other was like 45 degrees to the left. WOW! She had double vision. Either eye would work well, but with both open, she had two images, and they were stacked on top of each other. Made it tough for her to tell which was real, and telling where a counter top or the floor was was difficult.

DR said temporary, but he wouldn't quantify what that meant. The solution was to alternate an eye patch daily over each eye, so they would each stay strong. No changes for 30 some days, then one morning (and she was getting worried by this time), she woke up and they were focused again. Might not be an issue for you, but just a head's up.

Hope some of this info might help.

Best Wishes,

Ron, KS

Good luck on the 12th… I also have a DAVF and actually I am going for an embolization on the 12th as well! I am hoping it works but if not I will have to have a craniotomy as well. Although the doctor told me it wouldn’t be right away which surprised me because from everything I have read they usually do it the next day if it doesn’t work! Maybe in Canada it is different!! My DAVF is by my left ear, my only symptom is pulsitile tinitus in my ear while pregnant, now that the baby is 7 month old I barely hear it!!! Good Luck again, I will be thinking of you!!!

I agree......rest is the one thing that you really need to do! I napped every day for several weeks, the first week I took 2 and 3 hour naps and then slept 8 hours or more. I was able to just take Tylenol after leaving the hopital but take what the doctor tells you too.

And remember, you may have some energy issues after surgery, well into a year or more. I had my surgery in Aug. 2009 and am just now getting back to what I would say is a normal in my energy level.

Your brain is going to need the rest and in many ways, it will let you know right away if you have done too much. Listen to your body and do what it tells you too.

Thoughts and prayers for you !!!

Cheryl

Thank you all for your input. We had a trip planned 2 months after the surgery (planned before this all started), so I let my husband and family know that we should have a contingent plan just in case I didn’t feel up to a trip. They took the news better than I expected :o). XoXo